Dylan has written 188 reviews for films rated ★★★★½ .

  • Boyz n the Hood

    Boyz n the Hood

    ★★★★½

    Outstanding debut from John Singleton (at 23 no less!); not just a great first film, but more importantly a cultural touchstone that begs to be revisited. A blistering manifesto that's so incredibly thoughtful about the actions and reactions of living in an unending cycle of violence; the way Singleton uses melodrama positions it coming not from a place of angst, but instead from increasing pressure from all kinds of inescapable forces. The droning of helicopters, the blast of a gunshot,…

  • Paper Moon

    Paper Moon

    ★★★★½

    Tatum O’Neal acting circles around everyone involved by simply taking a drag of a cigarette and scowling. Nothing but respect.

  • Dog Day Afternoon

    Dog Day Afternoon

    ★★★★½

    Choices presented not in black and white, but gorgeously muted creams and browns. Uncharacteristically human for a crime movie, much more concerned with the why than the how of pulling off a heist, but just as tense all the same. Lumet’s characters aren’t the typical victims taken hostage or slick cold blooded thieves, they’re fallible humans all grappling with extraneous factors from the fallout of The Vietnam War to queer identity. Nothing short of a masterwork of empathy that still manages to be a highly entertaining itchy piece of 70s cinema.

  • Fast Five

    Fast Five

    ★★★★½

    Consider myself officially FastnFurious-pilled. You can write these movies off as pure mindless fun all you want, but it takes true mastery over cinematic language to make the small moment of two musclebound baldies embracing forearms sing like the second coming of Christ. Peak Rock and peak Diesel in one harmonious shot of solidarity making the greatest piece of entertainment they can help conjure. 

    And then the film goes to pull off the stunt with the safe (which I’m now…

  • The Long Goodbye

    The Long Goodbye

    ★★★★½

    “You walk out the door, and you see someone you know, and they ask you how you are, and you just have to say it’s okay with me when its not really okay with you, but you just can’t get into it, because they would never understand.”

  • Little Shop of Horrors

    Little Shop of Horrors

    ★★★★½

    An unapologetically kitsch salute to everything pushed to the fringes of society. Sex workers, b-movie creatures, masochists, and all sorts of other marginalized members of Skid Row on a level playing field to harmonize in explosive forms of expression that only the musical can grant. A murderers' row of supporting actors, but Steve Martin steals this thing and rides off into the night cackling like a maniac. I'm in awe that this is still PG-13 with the inclusion of his scene with Bill Murray.

  • Minnie and Moskowitz

    Minnie and Moskowitz

    ★★★★½

    “Lonely people, looking up” is absolutely going to be the name of my memoir.

  • Nomadland

    Nomadland

    ★★★★½

    This review may contain spoilers. I can handle the truth.

    This second watch is a much more richer experience than I ever could’ve anticipated; the sense of loss and displacement is almost overwhelming now after the busy work of getting to know Fern and her past the first time around. You’re right there with her pain from the beginning and suddenly all the wandering through ghost towns and gazing to the horizons make a little more sense. An aimlessness born out of the complicated nature of grief and not stupor.…

  • The Devils

    The Devils

    ★★★★½

    Derek Jarman’s production design. Oliver Reed’s mustache. Unparalleled majesty.

  • Opera

    Opera

    ★★★★½

    Keep rollin' rollin' rollin' rollin' (what?)
    Keep rollin' rollin' rollin' rollin' (come on)
    Keep rollin' rollin' rollin' rollin' (yeah)
    Keep rollin' rollin' rollin' rollin'

  • Another Round

    Another Round

    ★★★★½

    Live responsibly.

  • Nomadland

    Nomadland

    ★★★★½

    Stares right into the cracked wrinkled visage of America and finds the beauty in the cavernous pores that are left. Extremely romantic in the classical sense, examining the individual and their place in the untamed wild, while also not at all a romanticized view of this lifestyle. For every magenta hued sky or wide vista, there’s a five gallon bucket turned commode and freezing winter waiting in the wings. Chloé Zhao wisely recognizes the rose for its thorns and presents a…