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  • In the Earth

    In the Earth

    ★★★½

    Bold, restless, and with more than a few narrative hiccups, In the Earth is a vigorous exercise in shoestring cinema; a tour-de-force of brain melting hallucinogenic excess that doubles as a really quite nasty piece of schlock horror. Framed by the familiar backdrop of our current pandemic, but far from a mopey covid thriller, Wheatley instead burrows down into the push and pull of pastoral paranoia, and the inherent contradiction of the “nature is healing” sentiment. Sloppy, undoubtedly, but never…

  • The Father

    The Father

    ★★½

    The Father is far more jarring than its hazy glow marketing campaign may have led audiences to believe, a tricksy and caustic work that repeatedly pulls the rug out from beneath its elderly protagonist and, in turn, us. Taking place over an unspecified amount of time, The Father follows the lives of elderly dementia patient Anthony and his struggling daughter/support structure Anne. What starts as a relatively trope-laden account of the trials and tribulations of those suffering with dementia does,…

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  • The Prince

    The Prince

    ★½

    A deeply frustrating film, that repeatedly equates violence during sex with male love and longing, leading to a representation of homosexuality that reduces everything down to one base level. It's a shame because there is a certain quality to the writing, and the cinematography draws a vivid image, particularly in the prison, but it's sullied by its core tact with the material.

    Venice film #11

  • Parasite

    Parasite

    ★★★★★

    Despite the implicit shared relationship of their names, this isn't a backdoor sequel to The Host. In fact, taken on a fundamental plot level it shares little in common with the rest of Joon-Ho's filmography (itself a common trait for much of his oeuvre). And yet despite this, Parasite feels like the most structured realisation of Joon-Ho's defining traits to date.

    First and foremost, the picture's tone is playful in a sinister manner, flitting between broad comedy, no-punches-pulled imagistic satire…