marla

We’ll always have Paris.


★★★★★ masterpiece
★★★★ impressive
★★★ pleasant
★★ decent
★ bad

Favorite films

  • A Clockwork Orange
  • Casablanca
  • Annie Hall
  • American Graffiti

Recent activity

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  • Dune

    ★★★★

  • Drugstore Cowboy

    ★★★★

  • La Haine

    ★★★★½

  • Footprints

    ★★★

Recent reviews

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  • Dune

    Dune

    ★★★★

    A real author's blockbuster, in which Villeneuve's aesthetics and poetics - remarkable in this sense the attention placed on language - are part of an incredibly faithful transposition of a novel that has always been considered infilmable: the few changes in the narrative structure are in fact aimed at enhancing the experience of the viewer, who even without knowing Herbert's work is naturally transported into an extremely complex universe. Excellent casting, varied but never uneven cinematography, remarkable scenography enhanced by…

  • Drugstore Cowboy

    Drugstore Cowboy

    ★★★★

    In his second feature film, Gus Van Sant, showing the signs of the recent AIDS crisis, paints the life of a group of drug addicts in a dramatic, raw but poetic way: the young outsider played by Matt Dillon, among the ruins of the late sixties’ ideologies, founds in fact in drug addiction and in the identification with a type of hero by now ironically (and bitterly) cinematic the only way to assert his independence from the way of life that would be imposed in the following decades.

Popular reviews

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  • Malcolm & Marie

    Malcolm & Marie

    ★★★½

    The direction is beautiful and the cinematography very refined, but I think that the visual side, however remarkable, makes a chamber drama that should be based more on writing a little too aesthetic. The script is still good, rhythmic and often brilliant, but at times it yields a little and it tends to repeat itself in the second part. The soundtrack is beautiful (even if at times a little invasive), Washington and Zendaya give very good performances. The plot, the setting and some experimentalisms reminded me of Faces by Cassavetes (1968).

  • Arrival

    Arrival

    ★★★½

    An absolutely atypical science fiction film, in which the representation of extraterrestrials is particularly elegant and original because rather than creating a classically science fiction plot it serves as a pretext for philosophical themes: however I would have preferred that the ending would focus more on the interactions between aliens and humans that on the ethical question faced by the protagonist, which I found too controversial and less interesting than the reflection on the way in which language shapes our mind. Beautiful direction, great acting by Amy Adams, the cinematography didn’t convince me 100% but is still suggestive.