Nick has written 29 reviews for films during 2021.

  • Halloween Kills

    Halloween Kills

    ★★★

    I'm shocked. This was so much more enjoyable, creative and interesting than Halloween (2018). It has this electric pace and loose focus on our main characters in favor of something bigger, that worked here. It just felt much more like a real movie than the rehashed, embarassing 2018 film. It did its own weird thing with the city and side characters, and I'm sure that really won't work for a lot of people.

  • Squid Game

    Squid Game

    ★★★

    Thoroughly enjoyable, though the final product feels rushed and lacking polish. This is most notable in the editing. At least once, I noticed gaps in the editing timeline among a huge number of horrible cuts. This also extends to the pacing and structure of the show. It relies heavily on the modern conventions of tv structure, leading to the story not flowing right as a whole and making the story uneven. Personally I want each episode to have a staisfying progression in itself and this just does not do that outside of a couple instances.

  • The Night House

    The Night House

    ★★★★

    Making a massive step forward in his craft from the Ritual, David Bruckner has really impressed me with his sophmore feature. Where the Ritual had promise in how Bruckner established a dreadful tone but failed to follows through in many departments, the Night House doubles down in tone and excels in many of those weaker parts of his debut.

    To start, I think what might contribute the most to the crushingly oppressive tone that makes this the most visceral horror…

  • Midnight Mass

    Midnight Mass

    ★★★

    Once again, Mike Flanagan delivers something with promise that loses its sense of gravitas as it goes on. The first episode establishes the horror as something within ourselves very effectively. Whats more scary than realizing you are capable of the most horrible acts? Flanagan has used this techniquee with addiction in both Hill House and Dr Sleep, but this had the most promise after that first episode. Then it disappears.

    Not that the exploration of religion, community, and modernity wasn't…

  • Leaving Las Vegas

    Leaving Las Vegas

    ★★★½

    Something about the glorification of self-destruction in this movie is super hard to pin down. It's undoubtably authentic and emotionally engaging but it is without a doubt making alcoholism, suicide, and self-destruction really attractive in a very weird way.

  • Clickbait

    Clickbait

    ★★

    This review may contain spoilers. I can handle the truth.

    I can't stand narratives like this. They just cram fluff into their pedantic, one character per episode structure. Finally, in episode 6, we get characters we should have had the rest of the show with the Burton family. If we spent 6 episodes thinking Burton did it and then have it revealed that he didn't, that would actually be interesting. Instead we have this drip-feed plot, more interested in keeping up suspense by withholding information and progression for "big reveals", than building any kind of actual tension.

  • Annette

    Annette

    ★★★★

    The music and the musical structure annoyed me a lot less on rewatch. Still think there are issues with the flow, but the pace didn't sag the way it did initially.

  • Midnight Special

    Midnight Special

    ★★★★

    Fantastic. Much more emotionally resonant in the themes of parenthood and letting go than I remembered. Wish I could see this in the theaters again because the score in tandem with the visuals is so powerful.

  • Arachnophobia

    Arachnophobia

    ★★½

    A childhood favorite of mine.

  • The Green Knight

    The Green Knight

    ★★★½

    First time back to the theater since Rise of Skywalker and I think the projector bulb was dim. I get the shadows but why were the highlights so grimy? Why did the focus look soft?

  • Roar

    Roar

    ★★★★★

    Not good.

  • Hard Eight

    Hard Eight

    ★★★★

    Here's the biggest issue with Hard Eight: by the time Clementine and John have kidnapped the man who refuses to pay Clem, its only 50 minutes into the film; just about 10 minutes since their romance began and a little over an hour when they leave. What takes 15 mintues in the film, takes 20 pages in screenplay, which would easily translate to over 20 minutes of screen time.

    What this means is Clem and John's characters don't really have…