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  • Fatherhood

    Fatherhood

    This review may contain spoilers. I can handle the truth.

    Matt (Kevin Hart) is a dad. His wife, Liz, died after giving birth, and his mourning of her, coupled with the exhausting newness of parenthood gives the emotional mess Matt is in, an edge of desperation and humour. Even as the film is gilded in sadness it never indulges anger; all the characters in the film are propped by compassion, taking Matt’s heavyweight insults and indifferent eye rolls in their stride. There’s nothing and no one who is dispensable, even if they seem so.

    Read the full review on Film Companion, here: bit.ly/3vMzOMp

  • Sherni

    Sherni

    This review may contain spoilers. I can handle the truth.

    A few years ago, in an interview, director Anubhav Sinha explained to me the concept of cheese in a movie. He said: In those stories that can alternatively be made as films that will be very dry, I put some cheese in. Cheese is the shot of Ayushmann Khurrana heroically carrying the rescued girl in his arms in Article 15 or Ashutosh Rana's thunderous dialogue-baazi in Mulk. I interpret 'cheese' as the delicate sprinkling of something extra to give a…

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  • Joji

    Joji

    This review may contain spoilers. I can handle the truth.

    Who is there? One of the subjects of your kingdom. This exchange takes place in Joji, the third film by one of Malayalam cinema’s dream teams – director Dileesh Pothan, writer Syam Pushkaran and actor Fahadh Faasil. Joji is a reworking of Macbeth and while these words might suggest a period setting, Shakespeare’s tragedy has been reimagined in contemporary times, on a sprawling rubber plantation in Kerala. But Joji, the youngest of three brothers, is very much a subject of his father’s kingdom.

    Read the full review on Film Companion, here: bit.ly/3dIxzCI

  • Lootcase

    Lootcase

    This review may contain spoilers. I can handle the truth.

    Lootcase is a long-drawn but fairly well-crafted comedy about ordinary people caught in an extraordinary situation. The premise is far from original: A lower-middle-class family man finds a red suitcase full of cash outside a public toilet. With corrupt politicians, murderous gangsters and ruthless cops at war in the hunt for this missing suitcase, it’s amusing to see that the man’s biggest problem is hiding and spending the loot without inviting suspicion. Which is why Lootcase, much like Delhi Belly,…