• Like Father, Like Son

    Like Father, Like Son

    ★★★★

    What a tender journey through unimaginable feelings.

  • Annie Hall

    Annie Hall

    ★★★★½

    How had I never seen this before!?! Diane Keaton was so lovely. The film was executed beautifully. Uncomfortable, hilarious, and timelessly unique.

  • Monty Python and the Holy Grail

    Monty Python and the Holy Grail

    ★★★

    I think this movie is best watched with others. I remember ROTFL when I watched this with college friends in the 90s. But today, watching with just my cat, it produced only a few chuckles.

  • Taxi Driver

    Taxi Driver

    ★★★★

    I feel like I just watched two movies. The first half was about the sexual attraction between Travis and Betsy. She was a welcome relief from the filth of the city. But their connection was cut short when she found his behavior to resemble the city he loathed.
    Then the back half was a revenge fantasy that ended in the bloody death of pedophiles. De Niro and Foster both gave electric performances that have withstood the last 40+ years.

  • 52 Tuesdays

    52 Tuesdays

    ★★★★

    I really wanted this movie to be more about James’ transition and less about teenage angst. 
    But representation matters!
    It was refreshing to look at trans life through the lens of a parent-child relationship rather than the usual lens of cisgender fascination. It was an authentic and realistic “year in the life” look at how transitioning impacts a family, but the story was disjointed and lacked urgency. Reading about the making of this film was fascinating. I do applaud the work that went into filming for 52 consecutive Tuesdays and the respect they gave the subject matter. A must watch for the trans community and their allies.

  • An Elephant Sitting Still

    An Elephant Sitting Still

    ★★★★½

    When I say my favorite color is gray, people often ask, “Why?”. Most people don’t understand its beauty, but Hu Bo definitely did. The world around the four main characters was in perpetual motion, but the depth of the gray grounded the film with a sense of stillness. Vast, unending pain that sticks to the present moment just long enough to feel hope slip through your fingers. Watching this film was like bringing your attention back to your breath during meditation. Letting go followed by expectation followed by letting go. That’s the beauty of gray.