Israel Fehr

Israel Fehr

Pro

Sports journalist and radio broadcaster

Favorite films

  • Casino Royale
  • Ocean's Eleven
  • Superbad
  • Toy Story

Recent activity

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  • Miller's Crossing

    ★★★★½

  • Robin Hood

    ★★★½

  • Dune

    ★★★★

  • The Friends of Eddie Coyle

    ★★★★

Recent reviews

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  • A Streetcar Named Desire

    A Streetcar Named Desire

    ★★★★★

    In the style of its original medium — the theatre — A Streetcar Named Desire is certainly tinged with melodrama. But it tells a crackling story that's rich with symbolism and the quality of the performances make for a compelling film.

    On one extreme, Blanche DuBois is barely held together by a make-believe outlook of her life as she copes with trauma (and perhaps mental illness). On the other, Stanley Kowalski acts on every impulse no matter the consequence. What…

  • Sweet Smell of Success

    Sweet Smell of Success

    ★★★★½

    Sweet Smell of Success is a great "world" movie — in this case, New York City's cutthroat entertainment business — where the characters and set design combine to create an enthralling environment.

    The rooms and streets are populated by people who are deeply linked to that world and the narrative tension is derived entirely from how they engage with it. There are certainly parallels to a contemporary film like Michael Clayton (which I also adore), and I can see how…

Popular reviews

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  • The Damned United

    The Damned United

    ★★★★

    The Damned United perfectly captures the fickle and fleeting nature of professional sports. It's a story of ambition, ego and legacy and the fine lines those factors play in relationships and the ability to ultimately achieve success. Obsession is a strength in the world of pro sports — to a point — and this film explores a vital time in a person's career where it leads to a personal and professional crisis.

    Meanwhile, Michael Sheen's performance makes for such a…

  • No Time to Die

    No Time to Die

    ★★★½

    A meta mashup of the four prior Daniel Craig Bond films that works well emotionally in some parts and is unwieldy in others.

    I didn't expect No Time To Die to reach the heights of Skyfall or Casino Royale so to see it settle as a sentimental post-script to the Craig series (compared to the coldness of Spectre) was mostly satisfying.

    On its own merits, the Cuba sequence is awesome and in another film that didn't have as much to cover it would've been worthy of being twice as long. And Ralph Fiennes absolutely sells the hell out of No Time To Die's one f-bomb.