Jed Edgar

Media studies major at Wheaton. Movie lover and artist

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  • Beautiful Boy

    Beautiful Boy

    ★★★½

    A great depiction of addiction and it corrosive nature as well as its fierce compelling essence. The father son dynamic was beautiful. sometimes you have to let the people you love go and make their own mistakes, come to terms with their own consequences, even if it is detrimental for them and agonizing for you. There was a lot of almost Christian imagery in it, perhaps unintentional, but the father seemed as if an imperfect depiction of God and his…

  • Wonder Woman 1984

    Wonder Woman 1984

    ★★

    The film equivalent of that Kendall Jenner Pepsi ad. Get on tv and ask everyone to love each other... how come we never thought of that? This film is naive to a fault and that’s saying something considering the superhero genre. Pedro Pascal was great though.

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  • Do the Right Thing

    Do the Right Thing

    ★★★★★

    Injustice muddies the waters of righteousness. How Is one to retaliate? With a cruel left jab of hate or the dominant right hook of love? Can they coexist? Do The Right Thing is just as potent—if not more so—31 years after its release. Love or hate? Anger or apathy? Wickedness or weakness? Do The Right Thing cries out in anger and lament of injustice and hatred only to end in reconciliation. It is ethical to lament, but anger without reconciliation only ends in detriment to the community.

  • Reservoir Dogs

    Reservoir Dogs

    ★★★★★

    Tarintino—with this film, true romance and pulp—rejuvenates the American film industry, influencing Filmmaking for the next few decades to come and leads the charge of the Hollywood revival preventing it from becoming a one dimensional cliché. Everyone touches on it but the dialogue is spectacular, it feels real like conversations I would have with my friends, Tarintino uses that to create a virtual relationship between the viewer and his characters then uses their vulnerability to gain the audiences sympathies—particularly in this…