Favorite films

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  • The Crimson Kimono

    ★★★

  • A Day at the Races

    ★★★½

  • Top Hat

    ★★★½

  • The Professionals

    ★★★½

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  • The Crimson Kimono

    The Crimson Kimono

    ★★★

    A ponderous screenplay dragged down by an unnecessary romantic sub-plot. Fine performances by James Shigeta and Anna Lee and some great location shots in Los Angeles' Chinatown.

  • A Day at the Races

    A Day at the Races

    ★★★½

    Groucho, Chico, and Harpo Marx wreak havoc while trying to save a financially strapped sanitarium. One of the best of the Marx Brothers films with the boys in fine form aided by their usual foil Margarent Dumont. Several hilarious set pieces including Chico selling horse race tips to Groucho, Groucho affecting several Southern accents in a telephone conversation, a medical examination of Margaret Dumont, and a wallpapering scene. The script is cohesive and rolls logically to the next scene; a problem persistent in their later films. The film is punctuated by an action packed and well photographed horse race with a hilarious Harpo as the jockey.

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  • The Train Robbers

    The Train Robbers

    Widow hires an aging gunman and his gang to retrieve stolen gold from a wrecked train. The story emphasizes character development and Southwest scenery rather than action. There was little extraneous plotlines that allows the viewer to concentrate on any individual characters. Filmed in Panavision that creates great wide angle shots of the desert and a deserted town. Interesting plot twist at the end. One of John Wayne's better performances during the 1970s augmented by more than passable efforts from Ann-Margret, Rod Taylor, Christopher George, Bobby Vinton and Ricardo Montalban.

  • Dial 1119

    Dial 1119

    An escaped mental patient takes five patrons in a bar hostage and wants to talk to the psychiatrist who had him committed. A tense, low budget psychological that benefits from using only a few sets and some great black and white photography by noir cinematographer Paul Vogel. Great ensemble cast including Andrea King, Leon Ames and William Conrad before he fattened up and became TV's Cannon). Best performances were by Marshall Thompson as the protagonist and Virginia Field as the floozy.