Blindspotting

Blindspotting

Nice to see a city other than New York or L.A. treated with this kind of reverence; we’re given a crash course of Oakland’s haunts before we even meet our characters. The thread of a city slowly losing its identity indeed hits its mark, though the rest of the execution is a little iffy. Blindspotting’s back half is riddled with spoonfeeding and contrivances, and I don’t quite buy Daveed Diggs as a screen presence just yet. But this thing is frequently very funny (e.g. Rafael Casal haggling with a dude over a sailboat, the important flashback told furiously by an amusing side character á la Michael Pena in Ant-Man) and genuinely incisive when it concerns race and identity. (I like that Casal is referred to as both “hella hard” and a “culture vulture” over the course of the movie by separate parties.) Didn’t find Diggs’ rapping particularly heavy-handed either, though the script, which insists on circling back on itself at every opportunity, is certainly guilty of that.