Take Me Out

Take Me Out

You can be alone without being lonely.

Fritz gave me the pleasure of sharing the final cut of the film and I was blown away by the impact it had on me.

Moving and accessible- it’s reticent and also very awakened in certain moments and nothing short of an enormous effort and a personal reflection of Frauendorf’s own mind’s careful making.

Take Me Out is so real. Bruce is a reflection of how depression takes a hold of you. His words are selfish and dark-it’s the portrayal of how we experience emotions in the deep pits of our life. The atmosphere is tense thanks to the acting and character building. Bruce dwindles a knife during his most vulnerable moments. He not only pushes others away but decides what is good for him. He’s lost all morality and thorough thinking. The cinematography and camera work in every scene is deliberate. The sound design, lighting and editing is all perfect. In the first few instances we know the foreshadowing of Bruce’s past. He’s broken and inaccessible. It’s one of the best depictions of loneliness I’ve seen. It’s Shame meets Her a bit. We live vicariously through the monotony of Bruce. The screenplay is my favorite part and the pieces of his distant memory feel entirely real. This film made me realize how alone I was during my own dealings of similar emotions. We can’t cheat our emotions and sometimes we have to evaluate ourselves and accept this. That's what makes this film so important. He comes into focus near the conclusion (quite literally) and everything we’ve just witnessed plays back in our head. It’s a montage of everything we don’t see in the world when we’re blinded by our own self loathing. There’s a lasting image at the end of the film that signifies, I think, something greater than Bruce’s self. A great wake up call and a prevalent film. This is an ambitious film, the best work we’ve seen from the up and coming director Fritz Frauendorf. His name will be recognized in the industry most likely soon with continuous passion projects such as this.