Irvin Malcolm

Irvin Malcolm

Film critic. Screenwriter. Nerd.

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  • Ray of Sunshine

    Ray of Sunshine

    ★★★½

    It's the Great Depression. A down-in-his-luck man attempts to kill himself but instead saves a young woman from drowning herself. They begin a romance. This film is not technically a silent film. But it feels like it for most of it. There's very few scenes with dialogue and the film heavily relies on visual storytelling which is its primary strength. The film kind of meanders and stretches out a bit too much in the middle and parts of it almost…

  • Borderline

    Borderline

    ★★★½

    A black couple moves into an apartment in a European town. The woman of the couple has an affair with another (white) man. This results in much drama as this was set and made in 1930 and such things are of course frowned upon at the very least. This was as I mentioned made in 1930 but it is still a silent film and an experimental, avant-garde film at that. It co-stars Paul Robeson who is in it less than…

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  • Crumb

    Crumb

    ★★★★½

    An endlessly fascinating documentary on controversial cartoonist/comic book artist/satirist Robert Crumb. We get a peek into his life, his work and his family (among his brothers, as it turns out, HE'S the normal one.) You need not be a fan or even be familiar with his work to be fascinated by this remarkable documentary. It gets kind of personal, uncomfortable, shocking and sometimes really funny. Terry Zwigoff creates a fascinating document of a truly remarkable and unique artist. It must be seen by anyone even remotely interested in art.

  • Whiplash

    Whiplash

    ★★★★★

    Whoah. This is an intense, exhilarating (just like the blurb in the posters say) film. An ambitious young jazz drummer gets tormented both physically, psychologically and emotionally by a brutal teacher who pushes him beyond his limits in order to realize his full potential and achieve greatness. What follows is not an emotional, feel-good inspiring tale (well, not-so-much) but a brutally honest examination of what it means to achieve one's ambitions. The buzz around JK Simmons' performance is well-earned, IMO…