• Dr. Strangelove or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb

    Dr. Strangelove or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb

    ★★★★½

    This review may contain spoilers. I can handle the truth.

    Wonderfully dark, comical and thought provoking, Dr Strangelove is an entertaining phallic-filled critique of the Cold War and the easy death spiral that is possible within our beloved government and military bureaucracies at any time.
    The constant clash of contexts via music (“We’ll Meet Again” playing over nuclear annihilation) and characters (sexually frustrated war hawks vs impotent intellectual doves) propels this hilariously written, directed and acted (@Peter Sellers’ three roles) satire to a level I have never seen before.
    Not…

  • Whiplash

    Whiplash

    ★★★★★

    This film, albeit a beacon of toxic masculinity, may just be perfect. Every scene raises the stakes of the overarching conflict that culminates in the most dynamic and intense final showdown possible. Miles Teller and J.K. Simmons’ performances are disturbing, enchanting and empathy inducing. The story is clear and concise with two parallel worlds- the music and the non music- moving together to push the central character and antagonist forward, as well as developing a great arc for the dad…

  • War Dogs

    War Dogs

    ★★½

    This review may contain spoilers. I can handle the truth.

    Overexposed and underdeveloped characters, War Dogs was an almost followable Big Short and Big Short-esques film that could have been a bit more interesting had it not been directed by Todd Phillips, of Joker and Hangover fame.
    At times, I was thinking “man, this reminds me of the Big Short,” but alas that was not true because I was quite bored throughout and didn’t care about the characters.
    Definitely an interesting premise based on a true story with some great…

  • Frances Ha

    Frances Ha

    ★★★★

    A charming little film about a woman who only gets a little bit better while still being an immature asshole. Frances Ha was interesting and far better than the indie film version of New Girl that I thought it would be when Greta was rooming with Adam and the dude from Marvelous Mrs Mazel. Greta brought such charm and sympathy to an awkward and what would likely be an annoying character, had Frances been played by anyone else.
    The cinematography…

  • Cinderella

    Cinderella

    ★★★★½

    I am so thankful to have grown up with this film. Truly a remarkably diverse and empowering cast and story (thank you Whitney for singing about the silliness of just dreaming- let’s all go cease our own destinies).
    Jason Alexander’s accent was confusing, but overall he was a consistent and charming butt of the jokes, so I’ll let it slide.
    Maybe the Filipino prince and Brandy moved a bit fast but an hour and twenty five minute film doesn’t allow…

  • Funny Face

    Funny Face

    ★★★

    This review may contain spoilers. I can handle the truth.

    The prototype and far superior form of what I hear Emily in Paris is all about: fashion, romance, and Americans geeking out about Paris. But Funny Face really is so much more with impressive dance numbers spanning a wide range of contexts (ie fashion elites posing as Floridian philosophers) and styles (ie Hepburn’s super modern dance at the cafe ending with her planking on strangers). The ungodly age gap (39 years) between Astaire and Hepburn wasn’t nearly as icky as…

  • Chinatown

    Chinatown

    ★★★★

    This review may contain spoilers. I can handle the truth.

    Chinatown captures and expands on the best elements of classic noir films- whirlwind plot, mind boggling reveals and characters crippled by loneliness- and takes the well known vibe of quiet despair to the next level.
    Jack Nicholson delivers an incredibly dynamic performance that allows viewers to connect and empathize with his character despite his sometimes brutal tendencies. 
    Everything about Chinatown is quite disturbing and depressing from the rape-incest plot twist/Roman Polanski directing all the way to Faye Dunaway’s impossibly thin…

  • Avengers: Endgame

    Avengers: Endgame

    ★★★★★

    This review may contain spoilers. I can handle the truth.

    Endgame is what is best of the MCU. Each vignette capturing our beloved hero’s processing and reacting to the snap in the first third is quite moving and raises the stakes and respect for all of these amazing actors. The time heist itself is  a beautiful sequence of callback after callback and payoff after payoff with each stand alone film’s style as present and strong as ever. The final epic all encompassing battle is the ultimate shot of “watching a…

  • Captain Marvel

    Captain Marvel

    ★★★

    This review may contain spoilers. I can handle the truth.

    This is a fine MCU film. The skrulls are creative and entertaining characters, de-aged  Nick Furry is a delight, Captain Marvel herself is a badass when she maintains her cockiness and the use of LA public transportation is fascinating.
    While the film is engaging as a prequel to the larger earth based MCU happenings (the Avengers), Carol’s lack of larger back story (besides being best “friends” with Maria Rambeau) doesn’t allow for viewers to really know who she is and…

  • Minari

    Minari

    ★★★★½

    This review may contain spoilers. I can handle the truth.

    A beautiful and intimate story with incredible multigenerational performances and relationships that make this incredibly specific film emotionally resonant for all viewers.
    The child actor performances cannot go without recognition; especially, young David in any and all interactions with his grandmother. 
    Despite the heaviness of looming bankruptcy, a strained marriage, child heart issues, a stroke and strange white ass Arkansas-folk, the film cultivates a general feelings of hope, perseverance and humor.

  • Marriage Story

    Marriage Story

    ★★★★½

    A beautiful film comprised of raw performances, (Scarlett Johansson and Adam Driver) iconic characters (any and all attorneys, Nicole’s mom and sister, and the lady who observes Charlie and Henry) and generally amazing dialogue and pacing.
    This film captures the banality and intensity of the everyday trauma of life, love, growth and lack thereof.
    The humor sprinkled throughout the film not only allows for relief from the continual slow and deep blows to the characters’ and viewers’ hearts, but also…

  • Singin' in the Rain

    Singin' in the Rain

    ★★★★½

    This review may contain spoilers. I can handle the truth.

    Beautiful voices and set pieces, remarkable choreography and charming characters (all except the obnoxious Lina Lamont- whose voice and personality gave me a headache) bring this timeless film to life.
    Not only are the musical numbers impressive and joyous, but the general premise of Hollywood’s transition to “talkies” makes Singing in the Rain an engaging watch for any viewer.
    I could truly watch Gene Kelly, Donald O’Connor and Debbie Reynolds hang out, sing or dance for hours. Also, shout out…