Favorite films

  • Body and Soul
  • Le Jour Se Lève
  • The Treasure of the Sierra Madre
  • Safe in Hell

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  • Police Python 357

    ★★★

  • The Sleeping Tiger

    ★★★½

  • Guilty Bystander

    ★★★½

  • When Ladies Meet

    ★★★

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  • The Sleeping Tiger

    The Sleeping Tiger

    ★★★½

    The Sleeping Tiger, Joseph Losey's first UK film (after being run out of Hollywood by the red-scare blacklist), also his first collaboration with Dirk Bogarde, is a worthwhile if ultimately unconvincing psychological crime melodrama emphasis on the melodrama. Bogarde in his early 30's and still playing the troubled young man role that was his bread and butter early in his career does great work as always, Alexander Knox is excellent as well as the psychologist and Alexis Smith does well…

  • Guilty Bystander

    Guilty Bystander

    ★★★½

    Darker and grittier than the average 1950 crime melodrama, Joseph Lerner's Guilty Bystander is if not a lost classic something of an imperfect low-budget gem. Zachary Scott gives a fairly nuanced and convincing performance in the lead as an alcoholic ex-cop searching the NYC demimonde for his abducted son and it's this grimy milieu that sets the movie apart from the usual fare of the day. The rest of the cast is quite good as well. The pacing drags at times and Dimitri Tiomkin's overwrought score intrudes frequently but Guilty Bystander is a unique and engaging viewing experience for Film-Noir aficionados.

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  • Touchez Pas au Grisbi

    Touchez Pas au Grisbi

    ★★★★★

    The existential French crime film a couple of years before Jean-Pierre Melville made it his thing, Touchez Pas au Grisbi is Jacques Becker's brilliant study of a gangster in twilight. Jean Gabin and the rest of the cast are pitch perfect and what in other hands could come off as pretentious or self-conscious but is here played just right. Genuinely great and deserving of wider praise.

  • The Verdict

    The Verdict

    ★★★★

    Sydney Greenstreet and Peter Lorre's last film together was also Don Siegel's first as a director who said of the duo "these two people, these two incredibly different people, from opposite worlds and with the opposite approach to their work, would make poetry together." The Verdict is a fine Victorian "locked room" (literally) mystery that would not come off as well as it does if not for Greenstreet, Lorre, Siegel and the usual Warner Bros. studios team of actors and technical crew. They really knew how to crank out the quality stuff at that time.