• Parasite

    Parasite

    ★★★★½

    "Parasite" is an extraordinary universal metaphor for social relations. A thriller with a powerful socio-political critique, told through a group of great actors and a technical ability that mixes thrills, satire and pathos in a combination that leaves you breathless from the beginning to the end.

    A film that goes from one genre to another in a simple, perfect way and that leads the viewer to laugh and be afraid in the same scene.

    Pure genius, so we could describe…

  • Joker

    Joker

    ★★★★

    Have you ever felt unfit? Uncomprehended? Well this is the portrait of Arthur Fleck, “one of many” in Gotham City, now an open-air sewer, full of mice and crime that manifest itself every day.
    Arthur is sick. He has a neurological disorder that forces him to continue talks with social services and to take numerous pills daily. All this also has a side effect: in moments of great tension or embarrassment, Arthur can’t stop laughing. An unconditional reflex that does…

  • The Irishman

    The Irishman

    ★★★★★

    An intense and sentimental film where Martin Scorsese seems to collect and mix the pieces of his brilliant filmography to return to discuss the world of American gangsters, without exalting this criminal universe. Any exaltation is in fact put aside to get to the heart of the relationships between the main protagonists.

    Robert De Niro, Al Pacino and Joe Pesci give warm and passionate performances, and especially Al Pacino's character is perhaps the most exuberant and stars in some of…

  • Sound of Metal

    Sound of Metal

    ★★★★½

    The excellent opening scene of "Sound of Metal" immediately gets us into the world of the musician played by Riz Ahmed. We find ourselves in front of a demonstration of the power of music, of the vital and deep meaning it has for our protagonist.

    Darius Marder brings to Amazon Prime Video a film dedicated in particular to deafness, more generally to the great lessons that gives without warning life, about loss, dreams, love.
    You have everything, or at least…

  • Tenet

    Tenet

    At the beginning of the film there is a quote where Christopher Nolan tells us how we should approach this film 'Don't try to understand it, feel it', but this is the main problem of the film. We understood it but we didn't feel it.

    The strong points are definitely the action scenes especially the reverse ones. Great work by Ludwig Göransson who composes an excellent score. However, there is probably one of the most disappointing cinematography of Nolan's movies,…

  • Oldboy

    Oldboy

    ★★★★½

    "Oldboy" is a box, a Pandora's box that can show the worst fears thanks to a script with a succession of twists, some really shocking and brutal.

    An elaborate revenge-movie, in which the truth has many faces and even in the image of the "villain" himself we find motives and reasons perhaps exaggerated, but not completely incomprehensible.

    Supported by a soundtrack that is both fascinating and restless, "Oldboy" is a burning journey into the darkest corners of the human soul,…

  • Logan

    Logan

    ★★★★

    James Mangold has set "Logan" as a western, among desert landscapes, intense and melancholic lights and musical choices that we would not associate with a blockbuster.

    This is an aged Logan, tormented by a life of violence. There’s a tremendous amount of pain onscreen at all times, and only some of it is deliberately inflicted by characters attacking each other. Most of it is in Laura’s well-justified fury about her past, Logan’s watery-eyed daily physical agony, Caliban’s stress and misery…

  • Knives Out

    Knives Out

    ★★★½

    After dealing with noir, thriller, crime and comedy in "Brick", "Looper" and "The Brothers Bloom", the author decides to deal with a genre that is rarely seen in the cinema, the mystery with the investigator like Hercule Poirot or Sherlock Holmes to solve the case.

    Rian Johnson finds a fresh and funny way to tell a classic detective story. All the features of the genre are present here, and this leads to some predictable choices by the characters. With great…

  • WALL·E

    WALL·E

    ★★★★★

    Andrew Stanton and his creative team have managed to create a work of art so dense and full of artistic and moral significance that it is breathtaking. The first part of the film is really magnetic, as it manages to attract the attention of the spectator who finds himself following the explorations made by Wall-E through that big dustbin that has become the planet Earth.

    What is impressive about the film, in addition to the animation techniques used by Pixar,…

  • I Lost My Body

    I Lost My Body

    ★★★★½

    “I Lost My Body”, it’s a tale of two films, both unlike anything you’ve ever seen before.
    On one hand, there’s tale of self-discovery, healing and recovery after tragic loss. And on the other hand, there’s… well, a hand, disembodied from its body and now off on a dangerous adventure to reunite with its severed body.

    Filmmaker Jérémy Clapin adapted Guillaume Laurant novel “Happy Hand” for this animated epic, who become the first ever to win the Nespresso Grand Prize…

  • The Old Guard

    The Old Guard

    It is a very general film in its development and in the focus of its protagonists, whose most interesting psychological aspects are not explored in depth, despite the fact that each member of the cast is very convincing and in part.

    The direction and the screenplay do not shine in any phase but the action sequences are good, even if they are ruined by a not really convincing editing. Everything is automatically controlled and there is never a moment of real enthusiasm.

    "The Old Guard" could have been a big surprise, but instead a very disappointing film emerged.

  • Stan & Ollie

    Stan & Ollie

    ★★★½

    Instead of focusing on the most successful period of their career (introduced only in the prologue, which shows a key event of their future), the film focuses on the descendant period, with the last theatre tour undertaken in the UK by the duo, whose fortune on the big screen was now a distant memory.

    Director Jon S. Baird decides to tell the story in a melancholy way that doesn't however deny space for a laugh: it is particularly interesting to…