Blindspotting

Blindspotting ★★★★★

I walked out of this movie knowing full well that I wouldn't stop thinking about it any time soon. I was right — a month later and I'm still awed by how it manages to be and do so many things at once. It's both hilarious and heartbreaking, sometimes in the same scene; it tackles so many relevant topics without feeling preachy, and never taking the easy way out.
This isn't the kind of movie that offers you answers, because it knows there isn't just one. Instead, it presents the audience with fully-formed, morally complex characters and lets each of them present a different point of view that raises questions and gets us thinking.
And the acting, oh my god, the acting. The fact that Daveed Diggs and Rafael Casal's performances aren't being considered for any awards is downright criminal. Miles's exuberant, confident, brash personality paired with Collin's cooler and controlled ways hits the buddy film jackpot, and their real-life friendship shines through, and their effortless chemistry is one of the biggest highlights of the film. Still, it's in the more dramatic scenes that they really shine. Rafael Casal's acting in the fight scene completely blew me away, and in the movie's climax Daveed Diggs sells a scene that should've felt ridiculous. Jasmine Cephas Jones also deserves a shoutout for her flawless supporting role as Miles' girlfriend/wife.
And I can't even express my feelings for the film's visuals and editing. Every shot conveys so much love and care put for Oakland, creating a powerful sense of ambience and also masterfully establishing the movie's theme of gentrification. The editing also does a great job at elevating (and sometimes creating) the comedy, instead of simply relying on the script for the laughs, like so many American comedies do.
All in all I'm really angry this isn't getting the attention and praise it deserves GO WATCH IT WTF

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