Suicide Squad

Suicide Squad ★★★★

Suicide Squad is the absolute epiphany of grunge, the alt-punk aesthetic dripping from every frame. It leans towards the unconventional and stylistic, especially towards the beginning where all the characters are introduced to use by way of a montage. It's bursting with psychedelic colours; it's in your face and down your throat and it's proud of it. As much as I love the gritty urban realism of Nolan's rendition of Batman, it's a breath of fresh air to see the zaniness leaping off the screen.

That isn't to say that it isn't intense or dark or visceral; it's all of those things and more. It pushes the "PG-13" rating to the limit and then some (some day I'll actually be able to process US-ian rating systems through my Aussie brain). The action is razor-sharp and just as wild and insane as you'd expect, although sometimes it's so chaotic that untangling the cacophony makes your head hurt.

But it's not the straight-forward story, by-the-by scenario, or even the (somewhat lackluster villain) that makes the film inciting: it's the characters. They're constantly throwing razor-sharp remarks, deflecting the verbal blows and bouncing it right back. There's a chemistry here that can only be compared to magnets: opposites attracting in the most unlikely and warped of ways. These guys are insane and they know it. And they don't care.

At least half of the cast has a compelling personal history and/or demons looming over them that drive their motivations - if they don't constantly pop up through the film they loop around by the end. Make no mistake: this is about as character-driven as a superhero film as ever been. In all other Marvel and DC films the camera is distant and detached, more interested in the space around the characters than themselves. The opposite is true here: we get treated to close ups and medium close ups of the entire cast, peeling back their layers and their histories and motivations. The camera cares about these people and their attachment as a group, as by extensions so do we. There's a point around 3/5s through the film that I was waiting for, when their relationships all started to cement, their personalities evolving. There's one incredible extreme close up at the film's climax that sent shivers down my spine, the relationships and banter and collective charisma building up right until this point and executing it flawlessly. Easily some of the most fleshed around characters that any superhero film has ever offered up. The highlights were Deadshot and (of course) Harley Quinn, but I would have loved more backstory on Killer Croc and Captain Boomerang, although we did learn one of them has a fetish for pink unicorns. Have a guess which one.

The film isn't without it's solid flaws. Leto as the Joker was underwhelming, particularly with the character being given minimum screen time. The film also went through re-shoots and they stick out like a sore thumb if you're looking hard enough. The pacing is somewhat inconsistent, and to say that the villain is meh is an understatement. Leto's Joker doesn't hold a candle to that of Ledger (RIP), but we all knew that from the start.

But these are small flaws in what's certainly one of the better superhero films to grace our screens. The characters are a sadistic joy to watch in all their gory train-wreck glory, the action is solid and the dialogue top notch. Highly recommended.