Roger Ebert's Reviews

Roger Ebert's Reviews

Roger Ebert loved movies. These are his reviews.

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  • Spite Marriage

    Spite Marriage

    ★★★★★

    ★★★★ Great Movie

    The greatest of the silent clowns is Buster Keaton, not only because of what he did, but because of how he did it. Harold Lloyd made us laugh as much, Charlie Chaplin moved us more deeply, but no one had more courage than Buster. I define courage as Hemingway did: "Grace under pressure." In films that combined comedy with extraordinary physical risks, Buster Keaton played a brave spirit who took the universe on its own terms, and…

  • The Cameraman

    The Cameraman

    ★★★★★

    ★★★★ Great Movie

    The greatest of the silent clowns is Buster Keaton, not only because of what he did, but because of how he did it. Harold Lloyd made us laugh as much, Charlie Chaplin moved us more deeply, but no one had more courage than Buster. I define courage as Hemingway did: "Grace under pressure." In films that combined comedy with extraordinary physical risks, Buster Keaton played a brave spirit who took the universe on its own terms, and…

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  • Synecdoche, New York

    Synecdoche, New York

    ★★★★★

    ★★★★

    I think you have to see Charlie Kaufman's "Synecdoche, New York" twice. I watched it the first time and knew it was a great film and that I had not mastered it. The second time because I needed to. The third time because I will want to. It will open to confused audiences and live indefinitely. A lot of people these days don't even go to a movie once. There are alternatives. It doesn't have to be the movies,…

  • To the Wonder

    To the Wonder

    ★★★★½

    ★★★½

    This was the last movie review Roger Ebert filed.

    Released less than two years after his "The Tree of Life," an epic that began with the dinosaurs and peered into an uncertain future, Terrence Malick's "To the Wonder" is a film that contains only a handful of important characters and a few crucial moments in their lives. Although it uses dialogue, it's dreamy and half-heard, and essentially this could be a silent film — silent, except for its mostly melancholy music.

    ...

    Read Roger Ebert's full review:

    https://www.rogerebert.com/reviews/to-the-wonder-2013