• Pretend It's a City

    Pretend It's a City

    ★★★★

    There’s nowhere else like New York, there’s no one else like Fran.

  • A Teacher

    A Teacher

    ★★½

    I really liked Hannah Fidell’s own adaptation of this initial film as an FX series, and was pleasantly struck by this version.

    Unlike the series that followed this film (which chronicles a teacher engaging in an illicit affair with a student with different characters), this plays out as pure horror. Fidell’s direction lingers in scenes with no soundtrack, allowing the moment to play as it would in life, silence filling the space and sitting with you in the truth of…

  • Black Bear

    Black Bear

    ★★★★

    Gorgeous showcase of Aubrey Plaza’s talent; a sharp and trippy reflection on the costs of creativity.

  • Catfish

    Catfish

    ★★★

    Nev is a terrible person but this tiny goblin of a film is highly re-watchable for me. the scene in which Nev reads his sexts aloud to his brother in all earnest while wearing his retainer is why god made celluloid

  • A Teacher

    A Teacher

    ★★★

    "When in 2019 comedian Aziz Ansari was accused of assault by a woman, he responded that he was “surprised” to learn she was “uncomfortable” during their date, claiming to have misunderstood that the woman did not want to engage in a sexual act she felt forced to participate in. It was a pinpoint in the #MeToo movement that revealed the grey areas of consent at the centre of many instances of assault: that two people can live through the same situation but have experienced it completely differently."

    An excerpt from my full review on Screen Queens.

  • Arrival

    Arrival

    ★★★★

    This review may contain spoilers. I can handle the truth.

    When I first saw Arrival upon its release in theaters, I was captivated in that amazing "seeing a movie in theaters" way where every breath and beat of the score means the entire world to you while you sit in that black box and feel the pulses of the audience watching alongside you.

    At this first re-watch in my quarantined living room, some of the dialogue and performances read a bit more goofy; no longer swept up in the drama…

  • Mank

    Mank

    ★★½

    hmmmmmmmmmmmmm it was OK. Gary was very good although why it was decided an anti-semite would be a suitable fit for this or any future role is some hollywood bullshit. A charming homage with wit and an obvious admiration for the subject matter but not a particularly thrilling or interesting take on what could have been an excellent You Must Remember This episode come to life.

  • Nightcrawler

    Nightcrawler

    ★★★★

    This movie is bonkers and I love it. It’s so fucking dark and sad and creepy and has Bill Paxton and I suggest one general watch then a re-watch wherein you only look at Gyllenhaal’s eyes. What I’m asking is do you like Mexican food, Nina?

  • Sideways

    Sideways

    ★★★★

    One day I’m going to write about how both the creator and director of this film hate women but today I literally went to the wine shop for a Vouvray just before my re-watch of this and I hope one day someone will complain about my 10 minute lecture on how much I love this film who gives a fuck!!!!

  • I'm Thinking of Ending Things

    I'm Thinking of Ending Things

    It’s not new to say that Kauffman movies are fascinating in concept, painfully tedious in execution, but here’s another review saying so.

  • Baby God

    Baby God

    ★★★

    There is a moment in the film that best sums up its style and story when a male doctor shows the camera an iPhone photo of a woman’s vagina.

    The director explores a kaleidoscope of reasons that a man could do such horrors to a woman and I won’t be able to shake the uneasiness of this piece for a long time.

  • The Queen's Gambit

    The Queen's Gambit

    ★★★★

    Fellow Letterboxder /bratpitt has the actual perfect review for this but I will add some spare notes here: It's great! Anya is a joypunintended and the handling of what bisexuality feels and looks like for someone just suddenly tuning into that about themselves was welcome. Harmon is a GREAT character and some nuance would have been improved by a womxn-identifying writer/director but all-in-all this was a treat.