Favorite films

  • Taxi Driver
  • The Shawshank Redemption
  • Mirror
  • Persona

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  • Uncle Buck

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  • The Insider

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  • Easy Street

    β˜…β˜…β˜…Β½

  • Fanny and Alexander

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Recent reviews

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  • The Insider

    The Insider

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    A story about doing the right thing and suffering the consequences of powerβ€”about putting it all on the line. This being a Michael Mann feature, it’s also a study of manhood, of course, and in this case, of having a moral backbone. The Insider is, ostensibly, about journalism. But in truth it is a story about human beings, caught in extraordinary circumstances and how that comes to reveal their true characters. The film takes a complicated, talky tale of legal…

  • Fanny and Alexander

    Fanny and Alexander

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    What do we need to procure a powerful imagination? A childhood steeped in traumatic events, emotionally supportive family members, being exposed to various quirky people, enriching early experiences, long hours of solitude…. Ingmar Bergman in Fanny and Alexander, his ode to the origins of imagination, suggests that all of the above is true. Fanny and Alexander regards family through the curious, innocent eyes of a child, observing its illusions and relating its painful truths. Bergman equates family and adulthood to…

Popular reviews

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  • The Power of the Dog

    The Power of the Dog

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    Twelve years after her last film, Jane Campion returns to the scene of feature-length filmmaking with the slow-burn, neo-western The Power of the Dog β€” A haunting study of masculinity and repressed desire.

    "What kind of man would I be if I didn't help my mother?" So says Peter (Kodi Smit-McPhee) at the start of "The Power of the Dog," Jane Campion's quiet-yet-menacing neo-Western. We hear Peter say these words before we've even met him, and it will take almost…

  • La Haine

    La Haine

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    La Haine is a phenomenon, in that it is an abnormal, a surprising, and a rare event in French filmmaking, so often inhibited by the legacy of the New Wave. Presented in a stark but beautiful monochrome palette, La Haine holds nothing back. The narrative explores a wealth of topics including race, masculinity, police brutality, poverty, the aimlessness of youth and societal expectations. In most cases, this would be too much material to cover coherently in a film; however, the…