• The Power of the Dog

    The Power of the Dog

    ★★★

    Well, I think this is the one—you know, the one that ALL the critics adore but just doesn’t ruffle your feathers quite as much. Yes, I hate to say it, but The Power of the Dog, the latest from Jane Campion, is this years “letdown I hoped would never come.” 

    The major missteps for me are almost all plot related. The plot seems unsure of its terminus, or where it’s trying to end up. Because of this, we meander quite…

  • House of Gucci

    House of Gucci

    ★★★★

    Ok…my original plan was to deck myself out in some obnoxious shit, stroll into the theatre like I owned the place, and bask in the monogrammed glory of Ridley Scott’s latest, House of Gucci. But I just couldn’t wait any longer to watch this border wall of a movie, so I spontaneously slummed over to the Cineplex after work (in my grubby old Vans and thrift store rags), bought a ticket to the late showing (half price; thank you Black…

  • Jackie

    Jackie

    ★★★½

    Here’s a discount review on this blackest of Fridays…

    Jackie is a less-refined Spencer, with an equally absorbing heroine. Natalie Portman is remarkable as Jackie Kennedy. She publicly hobbles through the crisis of her life with admirable doggedness while privately struggling to balance grief and regret with vanity and legacy. And something about that accent turns me on 🥰. Between this and Black Swan, she just might be my favourite actress doing it right now, and she’s the main reason…

  • King Richard

    King Richard

    ★★★★½

    What a surprise: the feel good movie of the year made me feel…good. Yes, Reinaldo Marcus Green’s latest film, King Richard, rides yet another career-performance from leading man Will Smith, on its way to heights that could certainly earn it some Oscar recognition come March.

    The talk of the town here is, of course, Will Smith, who plays the titular “King Richard” Williams— enigmatic father-coach to tennis stars Venus and Serena Williams. Smith portrays Williams as a protective family man with…

  • tick, tick...BOOM!

    tick, tick...BOOM!

    ★★★½

    Why does it take a disaster for things to change?

    I ask myself this exact question frequently…

    If any film this year has come closest to encapsulating my life, it is Lin-Manuel Miranda’s directorial debut, tick, tick…BOOM! The similarities between myself and the film’s subject, Jonathan Larson, are numerous—I too just recently entered my thirties; I also continue to pursue a seemingly far fetched dream, as those around me wrap themselves in the security blanket of a 9-5; I work…

  • Belfast

    Belfast

    ★★★★

    Ok, ok, so Belfast isn’t #mybestpicture BUT it’s still a very good film. 

    It’s been said ad nauseum that Belfast is Kenneth Branagh’s most personal film yet—I don’t think it takes rocket appliances to figure that one out. It’s apparent from the outset—as we transition from the seaside machinery of the 21st century to the black-and-white warmth of the 1960s council estate where the film is mostly set—that we are in the hands of a man with vivid memories of…

  • Passion

    Passion

    ★★½

    I’m not super well-versed in the filmography of Brian De Palma. I know his greatest hits—Scarface, Mission Impossible, and Carrie. So this evening I decided to dig into the crates a little bit, and I ended up pulling out Passion, De Palma’s 2012 erotic thriller starring Rachel McAdams and Noomi Rapace

    This film is bizarre. And not David Lynch bizarre, but bizarre in a cluster fuck, debacle sort of way. There’s no consistency to any of the stylistic choices at…

  • Benchwarmers 2: Breaking Balls

    Benchwarmers 2: Breaking Balls

    I feel like this film was breaking my balls.

  • The French Dispatch

    The French Dispatch

    ★★★★

    Hallelujah...Wes Anderson has blessed us once again with a work of art, this time, The French Dispatch, an anthology of human interest stories pulled from the pages of an American expatriate publication located in the fictional town of Ennui, France. The film is laden with the familiar faces, idiosyncrasies, and objet d’art we all know and love—only bigger, and more Wes Anderson-y (if that’s even possible).

    Yes, in terms of craft—a word, might I add, that’s probably inscribed above the…

  • Spencer

    Spencer

    ★★★★

    My personal attitudes towards the circus that is the Royal Family aside, I found Pablo Larrain’s Spencer to be an incredibly edgy look into the warped world of England’s most precious dynasty. 

    I’d imagine those who worship at the altar of the House of Windsor will grind their crooked teeth watching Spencer—after all, the key figures are not painted in the kindest light. I, on the other hand, found it refreshing to watch a film that didn’t grovel to them.…

  • Antlers

    Antlers

    ★★★

    It’s fair to say that I’m a fan of Scott Cooper’s work. Black Mass and Crazy Heart, in particular, are two films that live in my mind rent-free. Cooper’s latest, Antlers, doesn’t quite hit those heights, but there’s enough going on to make it worthwhile.

    Visually the film is gorgeous. Living close to where the film was shot, I can say with confidence that Hope, British Columbia has never looked so good. Jokes aside, the natural beauty of the (very)…

  • Last Night in Soho

    Last Night in Soho

    ★★★★½

    From what I’ve read, the criticisms of Edgar Wright’s latest, Last Night in Soho, seem to be centred around a disconnect between the two halves of the film—in this case, a strong front end is followed by a disjointed back end (which also happens to be the story of my love life). While I understand this point of view, I can’t say I agree with it. For me, Last Night in Soho was a thoroughly enjoyable movie, and one of…