• Rogue

    Rogue

    ★★½

    On a more positive note, it is nice to see Megan Fox on screen again, and her confidence as both a woman and an actress definitely comes across each time the camera is on her. What’s ironic, is that even though Fox portrays a badass commander, she is noticeably ‘dolled up’ with eye makeup and expertly messy hair which heightens her attractiveness, rather than being slathered in gorier effects that would make sense with the life-and-death battles she’s constantly thrust…

  • Let Him Go

    Let Him Go

    ★★★½

    Love and heartbreak go hand in hand; this universal experience poses as a reminder of the fragility but also of the strength of the human condition. The durability of familial bonds, whether kind or cruel, blood or not, are continually put to the test throughout the film. Lives are built on the backbone of sacrifice, and as the Blackledges take great lengths to prove, family is worth that particular cost.

    -Kacy Hogg
    Review on Screen Queens

  • Kindred

    Kindred

    ★★★★

    Charlotte’s world grows smaller and smaller until she can’t even leave her room and as well as the historical connotations of confinement, it speaks to those facing a new lockdown, trapped and silenced by abusive families in these isolating times. Warping classics like ‘Clair de Lune’ and ‘Dream a Little Dream of Me’ and recurring motifs of caged birds and crows of bad omen to create an eerie atmosphere, Kindred isn’t super original but it is effective. As Charlotte becomes…

  • The Craft: Legacy

    The Craft: Legacy

    ★★½

    ...this feels like slick and polished television series. If what I had seen were indeed the opening few episodes of a Netflix series, it would be great; as a standalone film, it’s more than a bit limp. Even with franchise ambitions still a common affliction it remains necessary to make individual movies stand on their own merits.

    -Lucie Wright
    Review on Screen Queens

  • The True Adventures of Wolfboy

    The True Adventures of Wolfboy

    ★★½

    Krejcí’s flick is not especially riveting, which is disappointing, considering the message that resides at the core of the film. The script doesn’t give its talented cast enough to work with. The potential it has is never fully realised — and though it its portrayed as a coming of age drama, it is hard to tell whether it is one; Wolfboy feels as if it’s suspended in a state of limbo, fashioned to be too dejected at times for a developing audience whilst being too chaotic and choppy for the likes of a more mature one.

    -Kacy Hogg
    Review on Screen Queens

  • May the Devil Take You Too

    May the Devil Take You Too

    ★★½

    May the Devil Take You Too is a mixed bag. It excels in the message about abuse and trauma, but the plot fails to do anything interesting. The whole film feels like a throwback to older possession movies, but the terror doesn’t come from a sense of increasing danger and more from (often) cheap jumps. It’s a decent follow-up to its predecessor, but it’s not anything special.

    -Red @NIGHTSTREAM 2020
    Review on Screen Queens

  • Freaky

    Freaky

    ★★★★★

    Freaky is at once a visceral and hilarious experience. A true love letter to the slasher genre as a whole, it will have you grinning from ear to ear from start to finish. It’s not hyperbole to say that Freaky is one of the best slashers in recent memory.

    -Reyna Cervantes
    Review on Screen Queens

  • The Trial of the Chicago 7

    The Trial of the Chicago 7

    ★★★

    But ultimately, the film’s middling politics shouldn’t have come as much of a surprise. Sorkin, the creator of The West Wing, has always been a fan of the status quo and the functions of good governance. More insidiously, one could argue that The Trial of the Chicago 7 is merely promoting what he has always believed to be true — that change is necessitated by the checks and balances of a system that fulfils its function of serving the few in power while oppressing the many.

    -Keno Katsuda
    Review on Screen Queens

  • Boys from County Hell

    Boys from County Hell

    ★★★

    Boys from County Hell is another interesting take on Bram Stoker’s vampire lore opting to stick closer to dry, dark humour than to drama, love triangles, and extended fight sequences. Some of the plot beats are tired and the character choices predictable, but between the nasty gore effects resulting from the Abhartasch’s wrath and the chemistry between the characters makes up for the shortcomings. In the steadily elongating list of horror comedies, Boys from County Hell is a worthy addition.

    -Red @NIGHTSTREAM 2020
    Review on Screen Queens

  • BLACKPINK: Light Up the Sky

    BLACKPINK: Light Up the Sky

    ★★★½

    Even if you were to ultimately assess Light Up the Sky purely as a piece of promotional material, it’s still pretty entertaining. My personal knowledge of K-pop is limited to only the most popular groups and some hit songs, so I started watching the documentary as a relatively uninformed audience. I can’t deny that doing so definitely helped me to understand the members’ charms and the groups’ appeal. If the documentary is able to make even the most casual of…

  • Martin Eden

    Martin Eden

    ★★★★

    While still a “period drama”, the daring and interesting visual and narrative style of Martin Eden proves Marcello’s skills in weaving a tale that subverts expectation while also paying homage to cinematic movements past. It is hard not to get caught up in this melancholic and beautiful love story.

    -Rose Dymock
    Review on Screen Queens

  • Hubie Halloween

    Hubie Halloween

    ★★★

    There’s no need to lie: there’s nothing groundbreaking about Hubie Halloween. It’s a silly comedy from a silly man, one where the ending can be guessed about five minutes into the runtime. The guy solves the mystery, gets the girl, farts a few times and saves the day in the end. Nothing about the cinematography, editing or acting style will make an impact on cinema or stay with you beyond a few hours after the end of the film. But…